Subscribe Now! It's Free

Realty startup focuses on second-chance renters

Chris Dreisbach believes in second chances.

  • He has made the most of his after succumbing to substance-use disorder and landing in jail in his native Lehigh Valley.
  • The path to recovery led Dreisbach to a halfway house in Lancaster County, where he has since built a life, several businesses and a reputation as someone passionate about helping others.
  • His latest venture is an East Lampeter Township-based company called Hawkstone Real Estate and Property Management, which — like Driesbach’s other ventures — is focused on second chances.

 

How: The property management arm is rolling out an initiative designed to help landlords rent to people with credit issues, criminal records or other challenges.

  • It’s not for everyone, Dreisbach said. He expects the initiative to attract community-minded landlords who want to offer a fresh start to people who would otherwise struggle to find housing, including people with credit scores below 600.
  • The initiative, called Fresh Start, will match willing landlords with potential tenants and make sure the tenants stay on track.
  • “My theory is that the more opportunities we give to other people, the more people are going to step up and change their ways,” said Dreisbach, who is also CEO of Lancaster-based addiction treatment provider Blueprints for Addiction Recovery
  • They are the kinds of tenants he and his younger brother, Zach, rent to through another venture, Archduke Investments, which owns several rental properties in Columbia.
  • “I don’t think I’ve ever had a fully qualified tenant,” Dreisbach said.

 

Are there any takers: Yes.

  • Lancaster residents Mike and Alyssa Hess plan to lean on the Fresh Start initiative after they close on rental properties they are planning to buy and renovate in York city.
  • The properties would be their first, said Mike Hess, who works as a community relations representative for Retreat Behavioral Health, a provider with locations in Akron and Ephrata.
  • Hess said he would want to rent to people recovering from substance-use disorders, who often have spotty rental histories.
  • “It’s definitely something that we can do and that we can feel good about and feel like we’re a part of something positive in the community,” said Hess, who has known Dreisbach for about 15 years.
  • “He colors everything that he does with the spirit of trying to represent and serve people that historically don’t have a seat at the table,” said Hess.

 

The background: Dreisbach opened Hawkstone in late 2023 with a team of four licensed agents.

  • The firm is focused on the residential market.
  • He also owns Red Rose Sports Cards
  • In addition, he recently directed a documentary, called “Night of Recovery: Live from the Moravian Center,” which was filmed in Lancaster and features stories of people who have overcome addiction.
  • The documentary is complemented by a four-part docuseries, called “Repurposed,” which also focuses on stories of recovery.

 

The trend: State policymakers have been making it easier for people with criminal records to qualify for jobs and housing.

Chris Dreisbach, above left, poses with Steve D'Ercole, one of his partners at Hawkstone Real Estate and Property Management. (photo submitted)

Chris Dreisbach believes in second chances.

  • He has made the most of his after succumbing to substance-use disorder and landing in jail in his native Lehigh Valley.
  • The path to recovery led Dreisbach to a halfway house in Lancaster County, where he has since built a life, several businesses and a reputation as someone passionate about helping others.
  • His latest venture is an East Lampeter Township-based company called Hawkstone Real Estate and Property Management, which — like Driesbach’s other ventures — is focused on second chances.

 

How: The property management arm is rolling out an initiative designed to help landlords rent to people with credit issues, criminal records or other challenges.

  • It’s not for everyone, Dreisbach said. He expects the initiative to attract community-minded landlords who want to offer a fresh start to people who would otherwise struggle to find housing, including people with credit scores below 600.
  • The initiative, called Fresh Start, will match willing landlords with potential tenants and make sure the tenants stay on track.
  • “My theory is that the more opportunities we give to other people, the more people are going to step up and change their ways,” said Dreisbach, who is also CEO of Lancaster-based addiction treatment provider Blueprints for Addiction Recovery
  • They are the kinds of tenants he and his younger brother, Zach, rent to through another venture, Archduke Investments, which owns several rental properties in Columbia.
  • “I don’t think I’ve ever had a fully qualified tenant,” Dreisbach said.

 

Are there any takers: Yes.

  • Lancaster residents Mike and Alyssa Hess plan to lean on the Fresh Start initiative after they close on rental properties they are planning to buy and renovate in York city.
  • The properties would be their first, said Mike Hess, who works as a community relations representative for Retreat Behavioral Health, a provider with locations in Akron and Ephrata.
  • Hess said he would want to rent to people recovering from substance-use disorders, who often have spotty rental histories.
  • “It’s definitely something that we can do and that we can feel good about and feel like we’re a part of something positive in the community,” said Hess, who has known Dreisbach for about 15 years.
  • “He colors everything that he does with the spirit of trying to represent and serve people that historically don’t have a seat at the table,” said Hess.

 

The background: Dreisbach opened Hawkstone in late 2023 with a team of four licensed agents.

  • The firm is focused on the residential market.
  • He also owns Red Rose Sports Cards
  • In addition, he recently directed a documentary, called “Night of Recovery: Live from the Moravian Center,” which was filmed in Lancaster and features stories of people who have overcome addiction.
  • The documentary is complemented by a four-part docuseries, called “Repurposed,” which also focuses on stories of recovery.

 

The trend: State policymakers have been making it easier for people with criminal records to qualify for jobs and housing.

Share:

Gladly Sponsored By:

More Central PA News

Economy

A speed bump for PA job growth?

Pennsylvania employers added more than 111,000 jobs in 2023, pushing the number of nonfarm jobs to a new state record, nearly 6.2 million, according to the

Read More »