Subscribe Now! It's Free

DEP eyes $500M program to slash industrial emissions

Pennsylvania’s environmental agency is hoping to snag up to half a billion dollars in federal funding to start a grant program focused on cutting carbon emissions from cement kilns, steel manufacturers and other industrial operations.

  • If funded, the program would be called Reducing Industrial Sector Emissions in Pennsylvania, or RISE PA, according to the Department of Environmental Protection, which is taking the first steps this month.

 

How: The agency landed a $3 million grant last week from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to plan for the RISE PA program.

  • The agency is using the money to create a Priority Climate Action Plan for curbing carbon emissions from the industrial sector, deemed the largest emitter of greenhouse gases in Pennsylvania.
  • The emissions come from cement manufacturing, steel production, coal mining and natural-gas production, among other sources, according to the state.
  • Once the plan is complete, the state can apply for up to $500 million to carry it out.
  • The money is authorized under the federal Inflation Reduction Act of 2022.

 

What’s next: State officials are seeking input on RISE PA from industry, academia, community-based organizations and others.

  • The deadline is Jan. 22, according to a notice in the Pennsylvania Bulletin that lays out what the state is hoping to achieve through RISE PA.
  • The program might fund projects that retool factories with lower-carbon heat systems, such as electric heat pumps or systems based on clean hydrogen.
  • State officials also are interested in projects that benefit low-income and disadvantaged communities, as well as projects that incorporate what they describe as high labor standards and support equitable workforce development.
  • The state must submit its plan by March 1 and then apply for funding by April 1.

 

Why is this happening: Emissions from heavy industry in Pennsylvania plunged nearly 26% between 2005 and 2020, according to the Department of Environmental Protection.,

  • But the agency attributes some of the drop to the Covid-19 pandemic and — citing a national uptick in emissions in 2021 — says the reduction “may not be durable.”‘
  • The agency also says more work is needed to stay on course for an 80% reduction by 2050.

 

The background: Pennsylvania is moving ahead with RISE PA as another of its carbon-reduction efforts remains tied up in court.

  • That would be the effort to cut emissions from large power plants, an effort that would enroll Pennsylvania in a multistate program known as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI.
  • state court ruling blocked the initiative but the Shapiro administration is appealing the decision.

Pennsylvania’s environmental agency is hoping to snag up to half a billion dollars in federal funding to start a grant program focused on cutting carbon emissions from cement kilns, steel manufacturers and other industrial operations.

  • If funded, the program would be called Reducing Industrial Sector Emissions in Pennsylvania, or RISE PA, according to the Department of Environmental Protection, which is taking the first steps this month.

 

How: The agency landed a $3 million grant last week from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to plan for the RISE PA program.

  • The agency is using the money to create a Priority Climate Action Plan for curbing carbon emissions from the industrial sector, deemed the largest emitter of greenhouse gases in Pennsylvania.
  • The emissions come from cement manufacturing, steel production, coal mining and natural-gas production, among other sources, according to the state.
  • Once the plan is complete, the state can apply for up to $500 million to carry it out.
  • The money is authorized under the federal Inflation Reduction Act of 2022.

 

What’s next: State officials are seeking input on RISE PA from industry, academia, community-based organizations and others.

  • The deadline is Jan. 22, according to a notice in the Pennsylvania Bulletin that lays out what the state is hoping to achieve through RISE PA.
  • The program might fund projects that retool factories with lower-carbon heat systems, such as electric heat pumps or systems based on clean hydrogen.
  • State officials also are interested in projects that benefit low-income and disadvantaged communities, as well as projects that incorporate what they describe as high labor standards and support equitable workforce development.
  • The state must submit its plan by March 1 and then apply for funding by April 1.

 

Why is this happening: Emissions from heavy industry in Pennsylvania plunged nearly 26% between 2005 and 2020, according to the Department of Environmental Protection.,

  • But the agency attributes some of the drop to the Covid-19 pandemic and — citing a national uptick in emissions in 2021 — says the reduction “may not be durable.”‘
  • The agency also says more work is needed to stay on course for an 80% reduction by 2050.

 

The background: Pennsylvania is moving ahead with RISE PA as another of its carbon-reduction efforts remains tied up in court.

  • That would be the effort to cut emissions from large power plants, an effort that would enroll Pennsylvania in a multistate program known as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, or RGGI.
  • state court ruling blocked the initiative but the Shapiro administration is appealing the decision.

Share:

Gladly Sponsored By:

More Central PA News

Economy

A speed bump for PA job growth?

Pennsylvania employers added more than 111,000 jobs in 2023, pushing the number of nonfarm jobs to a new state record, nearly 6.2 million, according to the

Read More »